The Religion Network
                        Inspirational Quotes for the Day.

                       
                                                     
Today: Watching Our Words
This page changes each weekday.
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Bonus Quote:
Every exit is an entry somewhere else.

American playwright Tom Stoppard

    WELCOME! I'm Lisa Bowman. The Religion Network is an interfaith website providing daily inspiration, quotes and
    religious resources. Faith and religion are precious gifts that bless. However you worship, I hope this site enhances
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     On today's site:
  • God be in my speaking (Christian)
  • For things we blurted out (Yom Kippur confession)
  • Perhaps the only sin (Swami Vivekananda)
  • REVIEW: Icons from Sinai
  • A soothing tongue (Proverbs 15)
  • St. Francis of Assisi on words
  • The words of my mouth (Psalm 19)
And The Last Word: Martin Luther
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Photo by Chuck Bowman
Photo by Stephen Bowman
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Photo by Stephen Bowman
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And now, the Last Word:
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Photo by Chuck Bowman
In Constantinople, around the year 726, Byzantine
emperor Leo II removed a well-loved image of Jesus
from one of the palace gates, sparking a local riot.
Thus began a violent chapter of debate in the history
of the Eastern Orthodox Christian Church. Leo III
went on to declare all religious image veneration “a
craft of idolatry.” Over the next 100 years, the
“iconoclasts,” as they were known, set about
destroying religious icons and relics; even burning
monasteries and torturing monks in the process.
Thousands of priceless works of art were lost forever.
Banner  of St. Theodosia, iconophile and
martyr, in the lobby of the Getty Museum

Holy Image, Hallowed Ground:
Icons from Sinai
At the Getty Museum, Los Angeles
Holy Monastery of St. Catherine at Mount Sinai, Egypt  (map below)
Luckily, tucked away in the remote
shadows of Egypt’s Mt. Sinai, the Holy
Monastery of St. Catherine lay quietly
untouched. As a result, today it houses
the most extensive collection of
religious icons in the world, some 2000
of them, dating back to the sixth
century. Very rarely have these fragile
egg tempura paintings left the desert.
In 1997, a scant 10 icons and some
manuscripts were exhibited in the New
York Metropolitan Museum’s “The
Glory of Byzantium.” But now through
March 4th, an astonishing 43 icons
from St. Catherine’s Monastery, along
with six manuscripts and four liturgical
items are on display in the gloriously
rich exhibit,
Icons from Sinai at the J.
Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles; an
event made possible only because of
recent conservation technology
enabling the icons to be protected from
changes in humidity and temperature.

Icons, continued...
God be in my head, and in my understanding;
God be in my eyes, and in my looking;
God be in my mouth, and in my speaking;
God be in my heart; and in my thinking;
God be at my end, and at my departing.

Sarum Primer (Christian)
Excerpted from the Al-Chet, Yom Kippur Confession (Jewish)
Editor's note: Of the 19 confessions, four of them involve the words we utter. They are:

For the mistakes we committed before you through things we blurted out with our lips.
For the mistakes we committed before you through harsh speech...
For the mistakes we have committed before you through denial and false promises.
For the mistakes we have committed before you through negative speech...
Never think there is anything impossible for the soul. It is the greatest heresy
to think so. If there is sin, this is the only sin: to say that you are weak, or
others are weak.

Swami Vivekananda (1863-1902)
Indian spiritual leader of the Hindu religion (Vedanta)
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A gentle reply turns away wrath, but a galling word incites anger.
The tongue of the wise will enhance wisdom, but the mouth of fools
will spout foolishness. A soothing tongue is a tree of life, but corruption
of it is damage of the spirit.

The lips of the wise spread knowledge, but not so the heart of fools.

Proverbs 15: 1-3, 4, 7
The Stone Edition Tanach
Mesorah Publications, Ltd.
Photo by Chuck Bowman
"St. Francis Preaching to the Birds"
Giotto

Preach the Gospel at all times and when necessary use words.

While you are proclaiming peace with your lips, be careful to have it even more fully in your heart.
St. Francis of Assisi
on the use of words

It is no use walking anywhere to preach unless our walking is our preaching.
Let the words of my mouth, and the meditation of my heart, be
acceptable in they sight, O Lord, my strength and my redeemer.

Psalm 19: 14
The Holy Bible
King James Version
Grant that I may not pray alone with the mouth;
help me that I may pray from the depths of my heart.

Martin Luther (1483-1546)
German monk, priest, theologian, professor and reformer. He inspired the Protestant Reformation.
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Photo by Stephen Bowman