The Religion Network
                        Inspirational Quotes for the Day.

                       
                                                     
Today: Break the Chains
This page changes each weekday.
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And now, the Last Word:
Bonus Quote:
What seems night to you is broad daylight to me;
What seems a prison to you is a garden to me...

Jalal Al-din Rumi (1207-1273)

    WELCOME! I'm Lisa Bowman. The Religion Network is an interfaith website providing daily inspiration, quotes and
    religious resources. Faith and religion are precious gifts that bless. However you worship, I hope this site enhances
    your journey. Let us meet regularly and build a spiritual network.         If you'd like to know my story, click on biography
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 On today's site:
  • He broke their chains in pieces (Psalm 107)
  • The chains fall off Peter's hands (Acts 12)
  • A prayer of little faith is stingy (Henri Nouwen)
  • The Tao Te Ching and Wayne Teasdale
  • In the Forum: a true story from Suellen Fry
And The Last Word is from a Roman poet
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Photo by Chuck Bowman
Photo by Stephen Bowman
Then they cried out to the LORD in
their trouble,
     And He saved them out of their
distresses.
He brought them out of darkness and
the shadow of death,
     And broke their chains in pieces.
Oh, that men would give thanks to the
LORD for His goodness,
     And for His wonderful works to the
children of men!
For He has broken the gates of bronze,
     And cut the bars of iron in two.

Psalm 107:13-16
Holy Bible
New King James Version
So Peter was kept in prison; but earnest prayer for
him was made to God by the church.

The very night when Herod was about to bring him out,
Peter was sleeping between two soldiers, bound with
two chains, and sentries before the door were
guarding the prison; and behold, an angel of the Lord
appeared, and a light shone in the cell; and he struck
Peter on the side and woke him, saying, "Get up
quickly." And the chains fell off his hands. And the
angel said to him, "Dress yourself and put on your
sandals." And he did so. And he said to him, "Wrap
your mantle around you and follow me." And he went
out and followed him; he did not know that what was
done by the angel was real, but thought he was seeing
a vision. When they had passed the first and second
guard, they came to the iron gate leading into the city.
It opened to them of its own accord, and they went out
and passed on through one street; and immediately
the angel left him.

Acts 12: 5-10
Holy Bible
Revised Standard Edition
Photo by Chuck Bowman
St. Peter Freed From Prison
Filippino Lippi (1481-1482)
Santa Maria del Carmine, Florence, Italy
Photo by Chuck Bowman
    Being so eager to arrange our own future, we of
little faith close ourselves off from what is coming. We
have no patience with the unspecified promise and we
have no trust in the unseen situations which the future
has in store. Therefore, when we pray with little faith,
we pray without hope. Likewise, we pray without
despair, for despair is only possible for someone who
knows what it means to hope.
    The prayer of little faith is carefully reckoned, even
stingy, and is upset by every risk. There is no danger
of despair and no chance for hope. We become
midgets in a world of tiny things.
    The immense difference between hope and wishes
comes out in the remarks of a student who wrote: "I
see hope as an attitude where everything stays open
before me. Not that I don't think of my future in those
moments, but I think of it in an entirely different way.
Daring to stay open to whatever will come to me
today, tomorrow, two months from now or a year from
now --- that is hope. To go fearlessly into things
without knowing how they'll turn out, to keep on going
even when something doesn't work the first time, to
have trust in whatever you're doing --- that is living
with hope."

From "With Open Hands"
by Henri J. M. Nouwen
Ave Maria Press, 1972

The master observes the world but trusts his inner vision.
He allows things to come and go.
His heart is open as the sky.
Tao Te Ching
...(The master) lets nature take its course and watches as people, events, and the seasons
come and go. He has an inner spaciousness that embraces everything. He lets things be;
he acts by not acting, not manipulating others, process, nature, or reality...His inner vision,
as spacious as the universe, guides him in all things. He follows the way of Heaven, which
is also the way of Nature, the Tao, the Divine.

From "The Mystic Hours"
by Brother Wayne Teasdale
New World Library, 2004
Who then is free? The one who wisely is lord of himself,
terrified by neither poverty not death nor captivity; who is
strong in resisting his appetites and in shunning honours,
and complete in himself.

Horace (approx. 65 BC)
Roman poet